Gazbacho and Gluten-Free Croutons



Usually as we near the end of September, I’m blogging about yummy Fall soups and stews, pot pies and warm,

baked breads.

Can you believe this heat? I couldn’t bring myself to share a steaming hot recipe with you without breaking a sweat just thinking about it.

Not only did I want to share something cool and refreshing, I wanted it to include tomatoes. Have you seen the tomatoes lately?! They are so fresh, so colorful and so tasty.

My father’s gazpacho recipe has been a family staple for decades, and it’s the perfect pair to freshly baked gluten-free croutons. They give it that crispy, chewy crunch that is a delicious addition to any cold soup.

We ate my father’s gazpacho for Saturday lunch every week growing up. We would always get little cups of crispy croutons on the side and it was such a perfect combination with the tangy mix of tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers and onions.

When my brother and I were diagnosed with celiac, it was crucial to come up with a gluten-free crouton alternative. At the time, there were no packaged alternatives available. My mother and I experimented for years and finally found a recipe that we really love and I think you all will too!

You can also use them for salads, and in warm soups. We love putting them in tomato soup, but that’s enough for now about hot food!!

Gluten-Free Croutons


Gluten-free bread cut into 1-inch cubes (homemade is always best but we love Udi’s)
Olive oil
Salt and pepper (or any additional herbs)
Parmesan optional


  1. Preheat oven to 500 degrees.
  2. Toss the bread cubes with just enough olive oil to coat all of the cubes lightly. season with salt, pepper and any other herbs, coat with parmesan for a cheesy kick.
  3. Toast the bread cubes until edges are crisp and brown, but the insides are still chewy. about 10-15 minutes, depending on your oven. make sure not to burn these!
  4. Enjoy!!

*recipe originally appeared on Gluten-Free Girl and the Chef

Summer Gazpacho


3 very ripe medium tomatoes, seeded (reserve 1/4 tomato for garnish)
1 medium green pepper, cleaned and seeded (reserve 1/4 pepper for garnish)
1 medium cucumber, seeded (reserve a 2-inch slice for garnish)
2 stalks celery
1 medium onion
12-ounce can tomato juice
2 cloves garlic, peeled and finely chopped
3 Tablespoons tomato puree
1/4 teaspoon each of savory or basil, thyme, pepper and salt
2 Tablespoons vinegar
1 Tablespoon olive oil
2 raw eggs (I have left these out when I’m pregnant and it’s really turned out just fine)
1/4 teaspoon Tabasco sauce


1. Wash and dry the vegetables, chop them, unpeeled but seeded, and place them in a blender with enough tomato juice to partially cover.

2. Add garlic, tomato puree, savory/basil, thyme, pepper, salt, vinegar, oil, eggs, and Tabasco, and puree until smooth.

3. Pour the mixture into a bowl and stir in the remainder of the tomato juice.

4. Chill for at least 1 hour.

5. Serve the gazpacho in individual bowls or soup plates. Chop the remaining bits of tomato, green pepper, and cucumber separately and sprinkle them separately on top of the soup. Garnish with avocado, sour cream, or croutons!

If you’d like to buy your own gluten-free croutons, there are a few varieties out there. Our favorites are New York Texas Toast Seasoned Herb Croutons and Olivia’s Gluten-Free Croutons.

By Giliah Nagar at 

About CeliAct

Your needs for vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients are significantly higher if you have celiac disease or gluten intolerance—even if you follow a gluten-free diet. While some celebrities claim that the gluten-free diet is a healthier alternative to a regular diet, the truth is that the gluten-free diet may be lacking in key vitamins and minerals. B-complex vitamins, fat-soluble vitamins and calcium are some of the nutrients that the average person gets from the cereals, whole grains, and other fortified foods that individuals following a strict gluten-free diet may be lacking. Some individuals that follow a gluten-free diet also have intestinal discomfort. One way to support digestive health is to supplement your diet with digestive enzymes, probiotics, and other nutrients. Blog Writers are Zach Rachins and Max Librach
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